Category Archives for "Sweet"

Oct 06

Carl Sittmann 2010 Riesling

By Louise | 2010 , Germany , Riesling , Sweet , White Wine , Wines I'm Neutral About

carl sittmann riesling 2010Just pulled this cool looking bottle out of my fridge (the color on my iphone photo is a bit off – the bottle is actually a very vibrant blue). 

Another Friday night and another German Riesling!  This Carl Sittmann Riesling is pretty common in the US, and it’s pretty cheap.  The 2011 vintage is only $9.99 at Gary’s  Wine.

Sadly, the wine quality matches the price!  It’s not bad, but not great either.  There’s a faint floral smell with a sweetish taste.  It’s not super sweet, but definitely not dry.  The main problem is there’s just not much other taste…

My verdict?  A cheap sweet swirl in the mouth is all you’ll get out of this one.  It’s especially disappointing considering you could get a great Riesling for around $20  (e.g., Gunderloch).  But if you’re looking for an easy-to-drink cheap sweet wine, then this is it!

Dec 25

Mulled Wine and Christmas Pudding – The British Christmas

By Louise | Recipes , Red Wine , Sweet , Uncategorized , Wines I Like

ingredientsformulledwineLast year I reviewed some Gluhwein, which is a traditional spiced red wine drunk all over Europe and known by that name in Germany.  In other countries, it is called various other names.  In England, where I grew up, it’s known as mulled wine, and this Holiday season, I’m putting up a recipe for making your own delicious mulled wine (the British name for Gluhwein).  This is best enjoyed warm…imagine yourself next to a log fire with snow falling outside.  It’s the perfect winter drink!

Luckily, the recipe for this delicious alcoholic drink is simple to make and will spread the scent of Christmas spices throughout your home!

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 bottle of 750ml cheap red wine (I chose a merlot, but pretty much any cheap red will do)
  • 1/4 cup of brandy (again, any cheap brandy will do)
  • 3 star anise
  • 2 cinnamon sticks (or 1 tablespoon of powdered cinnamon)
  • 8 whole cloves
  • 1/2 tablespoon of orange peel (fresh or dried)
  • 1/4 cup of honey (can be adjusted to taste – I left the honey out of the photo)

Directions:

  1. Pour the wine into a saucepan and add the brandy, star anise, cinnamon, cloves, and orange peel.  (If you have some cheesecloth, then you can put all the spices into the cheesecloth so that it’s easy to take it out of the wine once the flavors have been cooked in.  If you don’t have cheesecloth, then don’t worry, we’ll use a sieve.)
  2. Heat on medium heat so that it starts simmering but not boiling (i.e., little bubbles on side of saucepan and not violent bubbles throughout).pot
  3. Simmer for 30 minutes.  Then add the honey (you can add as much or as little as you want).  Alternatively, you can serve the wine without honey and leave it to your guests to add it themselves.
  4. Using a sieve, remove all the bits of spices from your wine.
  5. Pour into cups and serve.

cupmulledwine

For a more authentic English Christmas feel, serve the drink with some traditional English Christmas Pudding, which is a dense fruitcake-like dessert (served with brandy on top and then lit on fire) enjoyed at Christmas dinner!

ChristmaspudChristmaspud

Nov 25

Gerstacker Nurnberger Markt Glühwein from Bavaria, Germany

By Louise | Germany , Red Wine , Sweet , Wines I Like

I’ve been secretly enjoying my sumptuous bottle of Glühwein for the past few days without telling you! Glühwein is the German version of what the English call “mulled wine.” It’s basically a spiced red wine served warm (usually spiced with ingredients such as cinnamon, sugar, cloves, vanilla, and lemon peel). This type of wine seems to be popular throughout Europe and is known by a different name in every country! For example, it’s called “vin fiert” in Romania (yes, I got that off Wikipedia so please don’t quote me!). This is really just the perfect drink for this season as it helps to keep you nice and toasty on the inside and rosy on the outside. Imagine yourself in southern Germany walking through a beautiful Christmas market (Weihnachtsmarkts), holding a steaming cup of this wine in your hands as you peruse the market’s wares. If you have trouble picturing this, try squinting at the label on this wine bottle (see the bottom of this post) – it shows one of these traditional markets.

Let me tell you about this particular wine. It comes in a large, 1-liter, brown bottle, and it’s best served warm (although they say that it can also be drunk cold). Honestly, a warm glass of this on a blustery winter day will melt all your troubles away! And for me, it really does just take one glass! Don’t let that 10% alcohol label fool you, because I’m pretty sure the hot vapors or something in this wine gets you drunk real fast! As for how to heat it, I think the traditional way is to do it in a saucepan, but I’m lazy and will just put it in the microwave. I usually put around 3 or 4 shots worth into a small microwavable juice glass and heat it for 15 seconds. Just make sure you don’t boil it!

What does it taste like? A bit like warm sangria actually. You can definitely taste the citrus in this as well as that generous splash of cinnamon. It’s also nice and sweet, although I don’t think it’s sickeningly sweet. However, it is definitely a drink to sip slowly and enjoy. Maybe drink the bottle with friends after a night out in the cold or just save it for yourself to drink over several days. I’ll write a review about how I keep my wine fresh in a few days so you can do the same.

Price: dirt cheap at $7.99 for a 1-liter bottle! Where to buy? You guessed it – Astor Wine and Spirits. I honestly do not work for them!